Sierra Snow Doesn’t Disappoint…More on the Way!

Squaw Valley webcam from Sunday afternoon. 2-4 feet reported on average at most Sierra Ski Resorts!

Some fantastic snow totals showing up in the Sierra now. Like we said, 2-4 feet or so expected overall. Some areas did even better. Just a sampling of some of the ski resort totals…

Mammoth: 3-5 feet, and they’ll be opening this week!
Mt. Rose near Reno: 29-33″
Alpine Meadows: 43-59″
Squaw Valley: 24-42″on average. Calling it their biggest November ever.
Heavenly reporting 35″
Sugar Bowl coming in with 36-40″
Northstar at Tahoe: 38-48″
Bear Valley looks to be well over 30″
Boreal Mountain: 48-60″
Dodge Ridge picked up about 39″
Homewood reporting 43-59″ as well.
Kirkwood calling it 60-66″.
Sierra at Tahoe has 48-58″
China Peak/Sierra Summit with 26-36″

In SoCal… so far about 3-4″ on Mt. Baldy. Similar totals reported out at Big Bear.

The latest on the snow dump in the Sierra here.

And guess what? We’re not done. One more wave is going to slide down through California and Nevada late Monday night and Tuesday. This has to potential to dump another 1-3 feet of snow in these areas. Truly an awesome early season blast of winter for the Sierra.

A couple cool links for you to round things out.

Neat photos from space sent to the Twitters!

WLFI in Lafayette, IN has put together a nice collection of Indiana severe weather events from the last couple years:
2009
2010

Lastly: Our first full moon of the month will occur tonight. But it will be referred to as a “blue moon,” a name a lot of people typically associate with the second full moon in one month. Ah, but there’s an interesting history that I had no idea about referring to the term “blue moon.” Read about it here.

Some fantastic snow totals showing up in the Sierra now. Like we said, 2-4 feet or so expected overall. Some areas did even better. Just a sampling of some of the ski resort totals…

Mammoth: 3-5 feet, and they’ll be opening this week! http://www.mammothmountain.com/MyMammoth/?section=weather
Mt. Rose near Reno: 29-33″ http://www.mtrose.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=19&Itemid=26
Alpine Meadows: 43-59″ http://www.skialpine.com/mountain/snow-report
Squaw Valley: 24-42″on average. Calling it their biggest November ever. http://www.squaw.com/winter/snoreport.html
Heavenly reporting 35″ http://www.skiheavenly.com/the-mountain/snow-report/snow-report.aspx
Sugar Bowl coming in with 36-40″ http://www.sugarbowl.com/4305
Northstar at Tahoe: 38-48″ http://www.northstarattahoe.com/snowreport.asp
Bear Valley looks to be well over 30″ http://www.bearvalley.com/the-mountain/conditions/snow-report/
Boreal Mountain: 48-60″ http://www.rideboreal.com/winter/DOR
Dodge Ridge picked up about 39″ http://prance.us/iprance/DodgeRidge/snowreport.php
Homewood reporting 43-59″ as well. http://www.skihomewood.com/mountain/snow-report
Kirkwood calling it 60-66″. http://www.kirkwood.com/pages/themountain/snowreport.asp
Sierra at Tahoe has 48-58″ http://www.sierraattahoe.com/winter/snow-report.asp
China Peak/Sierra Summit with 26-36″ http://www.skichinapeak.com/conditions.aspx

In SoCal… so far about 3-4″ on Mt. Baldy http://www.mtbaldy.com/snow-report.htm. Similar totals reported out at Big Bear.

http://www.rgj.com/article/20101108/NEWS15/11080342 The latest on the snow dump in the Sierra here.

And guess what? We’re not done. One more wave is going to slide down through California and Nevada late Monday night and Tuesday. This has to potential to dump another 1-3 feet of snow in these areas. Truly an awesome early season blast of winter for the Sierra.

A couple cool links for you to round things out.

Neat photos from space sent to the Twitters! http://meteorologicalmusings.blogspot.com/2010/11/views-of-earth-from-space.html

WLFI in Lafayette, IN has put together a nice collection of Indiana severe weather events from the last couple years:

2009: http://blogs.wlfi.com/2010/11/19/22090/
2010: http://blogs.wlfi.com/2010/11/19/2010-severe-weather-events/

Lastly: Our first full moon of the month will occur tonight. But it will be referred to as a “blue moon,” a name a lot of people typically associate with the second full moon in one month. Ah, but there’s an interesting history that I had no idea about referring to the term “blue moon.” Read about it here: http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/20101119/sc_space/thereallystrangestorybehindsundaysbluemoon Some fantastic snow totals showing up in the Sierra now. Like we said, 2-4 feet or so expected overall. Some areas did even better. Just a sampling of some of the ski resort totals…

Mammoth: 3-5 feet, and they’ll be opening this week! http://www.mammothmountain.com/MyMammoth/?section=weather
Mt. Rose near Reno: 29-33″ http://www.mtrose.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=19&Itemid=26
Alpine Meadows: 43-59″ http://www.skialpine.com/mountain/snow-report
Squaw Valley: 24-42″on average. Calling it their biggest November ever. http://www.squaw.com/winter/snoreport.html
Heavenly reporting 35″ http://www.skiheavenly.com/the-mountain/snow-report/snow-report.aspx
Sugar Bowl coming in with 36-40″ http://www.sugarbowl.com/4305
Northstar at Tahoe: 38-48″ http://www.northstarattahoe.com/snowreport.asp
Bear Valley looks to be well over 30″ http://www.bearvalley.com/the-mountain/conditions/snow-report/
Boreal Mountain: 48-60″ http://www.rideboreal.com/winter/DOR
Dodge Ridge picked up about 39″ http://prance.us/iprance/DodgeRidge/snowreport.php
Homewood reporting 43-59″ as well. http://www.skihomewood.com/mountain/snow-report
Kirkwood calling it 60-66″. http://www.kirkwood.com/pages/themountain/snowreport.asp
Sierra at Tahoe has 48-58″ http://www.sierraattahoe.com/winter/snow-report.asp
China Peak/Sierra Summit with 26-36″ http://www.skichinapeak.com/conditions.aspx

In SoCal… so far about 3-4″ on Mt. Baldy http://www.mtbaldy.com/snow-report.htm. Similar totals reported out at Big Bear.

http://www.rgj.com/article/20101108/NEWS15/11080342 The latest on the snow dump in the Sierra here.

And guess what? We’re not done. One more wave is going to slide down through California and Nevada late Monday night and Tuesday. This has to potential to dump another 1-3 feet of snow in these areas. Truly an awesome early season blast of winter for the Sierra.

A couple cool links for you to round things out.

Neat photos from space sent to the Twitters! http://meteorologicalmusings.blogspot.com/2010/11/views-of-earth-from-space.html

WLFI in Lafayette, IN has put together a nice collection of Indiana severe weather events from the last couple years:

2009: http://blogs.wlfi.com/2010/11/19/22090/
2010: http://blogs.wlfi.com/2010/11/19/2010-severe-weather-events/

Lastly: Our first full moon of the month will occur tonight. But it will be referred to as a “blue moon,” a name a lot of people typically associate with the second full moon in one month. Ah, but there’s an interesting history that I had no idea about referring to the term “blue moon.” Read about it here: http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/20101119/sc_space/thereallystrangestorybehindsundaysbluemoon

The Weather History Post

Came across a bunch of information on some historical weather on this, the 35th anniversary of the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald. I wrote briefly about the Edmund Fitzgerald a few weeks ago during that bomb of a storm in the Upper Midwest. Today there are many perspectives and talking points on this storm. And there’s also another storm celebrating its 97th anniversary today: The White Hurricane of 1913.

From the Updraft Blog in Minnesota, Paul Huttner discusses whether or not modern weather forecasting may have saved the Edmund Fitzgerald. It’s more than likely the case that it would have. Modern forecasting would have done a lot to minimize losses in some past events. And if you’ve noticed, there has not been a wreck of quite that magnitude on the Lakes since that storm.

In the Watts Up With That? blog, Ric Werme discusses some of the other great storms of the Great Lakes. A great historical summary. Of note, the first storm he describes from 1913, is that White Hurricane. A book with that same name was written a few years back. Anyone with any interest in shipping, storms, or weather history would enjoy that book thoroughly. Also, WROC in Rochester, NY has a brief entry on that storm. While the Edmund Fitzgerald takes the modern cake for big storms on the Lakes, the White Hurricane of 1913 was an amazing tragedy and meteorologically mesmerizing storm.

The 40/29 Weather Blog in Northwest Arkansas has another look at the weather from that day, and it also has some cool video about the Edmund Fitzgerald.

So this was truly one of the more memorable storms in our nation’s history. And of course, we can thank Gordon Lightfoot for immortalizing it in song.

Other Historical Tidbits

Some other odds and ends about past weather today:

WLFI in Indiana has a cool blog entry on historical autumn severe weather outbreaks in that part of the Midwest. A lot of people associate severe weather with spring, but it’s certainly true that autumn can produce some ferocious severe weather outbreaks.

The NWS in Washington, DC (Sterling, VA) has gone through and re-sorted snowfall data for Baltimore. They’ve now compiled the top 10 list of snow there, with some new rankings of the biggest storms. Not surprisingly, 2010 shows up on that list a lot. Interesting to note that the big time 3 day events have been extremely rare since 1960.

The Capital Weather Gang has a nice retrospective on Black Sunday and the Dust Bowl. Just an awful event.

Other Links

WCPO TV in Cincinnati has some information and some helpful tips on protecting your home from severe weather.

Some perspective on this hurricane season. I don’t like to talk about places being overdue or “lucking” out in the weather. But given the extreme amount of activity this hurricane season, the United States truly dodged a bullet. Despite 19 storms and 12 hurricanes, the US was spared this season for the most part. But remember, it only takes one storm (see the hurricane season of 1992 and Hurricane Andrew).

Contentious climate scientist Michael Mann speaks out on the issue and how he feels that community has lost control of their message.

And lastly, some video of a dust devil impacting a soccer game! This one has been floating around for awhile, but it’s always worth another look.

Wrapping Up the Midwest Bomb

What a storm it was for sure. It looks like the lowest pressure was around 28.20″, or 954.96mb, recorded at Orr and Bigfork, MN. This blows away the previous mainland US record set in Cleveland, OH in 1978 of 28.28″ or about 958 mb. In terms of the damage, yesterday alone had 287 wind reports and 24 tornado reports. The previous day had about 150 wind reports (a lot though from another system in the Carolinas) and one tornado report. So, all in all, it looks like we probably ended up with close to 400 wind reports and 25 tornadoes from this storm in the Midwest, which is remarkable. Lots of links on this one:

SPC Mesoanalysis for 10/26/10 at 5 PM Central Time, near the peak of the storm.

A full recap on the pressure record is here.

A few tornadoes were confirmed in Ohio.

About eight tornadoes were confirmed in Central Indiana.

A couple of stronger tornadoes were confirmed around Chicago. Some good imagery and information here.

Here’s some video from WSBT in Indiana of a tornado destroying a pole barn.

The highest confirmed wind gust I can find is about 77 mph in Greenfield, IN. In addition to all the wind and storminess, there’s also the snow aspect of this storm! As with most fall storms, this one dragged down some cold air, enough to change any liquid to snow in the Dakotas and Minnesota. Thus far, Harvey, ND is the champ with 8″ of snow. Duluth, MN isn’t far behind though with 7.4″. Blizzard, High Wind, and Winter Storm Warnings continue today for much of the Upper Midwest.

The strong winds also helped to change the lake level of Lake Michigan, with westerly and northwesterly winds shifting water from the Illinois/Wisconsin side to the Michigan side. This is actually not terribly uncommon, but still pretty cool. I recall several instances of this happening on Lake Erie when I worked in Upstate NY.

More info on the storm in Minnesota here.

And some really cool loops and imagery on the pressure falls from the NWS in LaCrosse, WI here.

But is it really the record?

As is always the case with almost any record, there will be claims, disputes, etc. that, “Well, it’s not REALLY the record.” And of course, this time around, we have that as well. Folks in the Northwest are amused by the shock and hype of this storm in the Midwest…because storms such as this routinely impact them every winter. They’ve got a good point, as some of the pressures measured in past winter storms there (specifically one in 1995 measured at 958 mb, not even near the center of the storm) have indeed been routinely close to some of the “record” readings.

A slightly sarcastic tone in this entry from Dr. Cliff Mass, who publishes a great Northwest weather blog.

A great, great history of wind storms in the Northwest is here.

That all being said however, the truth is that in terms of actual measurements on land in the lower 48, away from the East coast, this storm is currently king.  But I’m sure one day, with better monitoring now in place in the Northwest, we’ll shatter this record as well.

But let’s not forget, this storm actually started in the Northwest too!